With a feeling of anticipation we set off for our mammal survey at the top of Reedy Creek Track as this is the area where we have had positive results regarding Spot-tailed Quoll analysis from hair tubes. 

The 14 people who took part in the survey on November 21 drove to Benwarrin and then along Big Hill Track to Reedy Creek Track. We were pleased to have Alan, Patrick’s friend from Ireland, Harvey from the Green Army, and also Paddy Day, a young student from St Joseph’s College, who was keen to do some conservation work with the Friends’ Group. Paddy’s father, Greg, and his younger brother, James, also joined in the activity.

Unfortunately our results did not indicate any Quoll presence – Paddy had to be content with kangaroos, wallabies and an inquisitive fox.

The Mammal Survey

Patrick explains to Harvey, Paddy, James and Greg how the cameras operate
Patrick explains to Harvey, Paddy, James and Greg how the cameras operate

Placing a camera in position
Placing a camera in position

Kaye and James set up one of the baiting stations
Kaye and James set up one of the baiting stations

Patrick and Paddy take a GPS reading for the camera while Graeme records the numbers
Patrick and Paddy take a GPS reading for the camera while Graeme records the numbers

Harvey clears some of the excess vegetation
Harvey clears some of the excess vegetation

Marking the area to help with retrieval of cameras
Marking the area to help with retrieval of cameras


The Walk to Kelsall’s Rock

Having driven back east along Big Hill Track we parked the cars where Lachie had marked the overgrown walking track leading to Kelsall’s Rock Lookout.

Lunch
We had lunch about halfway up the track overlooking the gully – a pleasant spot.

View
The steep climb up to the rock lookout was certainly worth the effort – the view across Grassy Creek valley was magnificent and we were entertained by two Peregrine Falcons soaring through the valley – great experience.

Thanks to Lachie for planning and leading the walk.

Report and photographs by Marg MacDonald

Events Calendar

Sep
21

Thu 9:00am - 12:00pm

Sep
24

Sun 9:30am - 11:00am

Sep
25

Mon 9:30am - 11:00am

Sep
25

Mon 11:00am - 1:00pm

Weed of the month

Bushy Yate

Bushy Yate

Bushy Yate, Eucalyptus lehmannii, is an evergreen densely rounded tree to 8m with spread of 3m. It is endemic to the south coast of Western Australia but has naturalised into the Surf Coast cliffs, coastal areas and bushland where it seeds prolifically. The orange flower pods form clusters like fingers extending from a hand and the horned seed capsules are fused at the base in clusters of five to eight.

More details about how to control this weed can be found in the archive of Weeds of the Month.

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