I have been enjoying our summer “snow”, with many of our larger plants and trees covered in masses of small white flowers.

Our iconic Moonah Melaleuca lanceolata has dense clusters of small, creamy-white, bottle-brush flowers while Tree Everlasting Ozothamnus ferrugineus has clusters of tiny, scented white flowers in large, domed flower-heads.

Moonah
Moonah

Moonah flowers
Moonah flowers

Tree Everlasting
Tree Everlasting 

Common Cassinia Cassinia aculeata, which is easy to confuse with Tree Everlasting, has tiny conical flowers in flatter clusters, and finer leaves with rolled-under margins.

 Common Cassinia
Common Cassinia

The cream “Snugglepot and Cuddlepie” flowers on the Messmate, Eucalyptus obliqua are less showy from a distance, but still delightful. The abundant, clustered flowers are fragrant and very attractive to birds.

Messmate
Messmate

I have been very interested to see Sweet Bursaria Bursaria spinosa subsp. spinosa, in all stages of flowering. It is a locally common plant, growing to about two metres high, with terminal panicles of fragrant, creamy, star-like flowers. Clusters of small, purse-like seed pods are also developing, starting as a delicate pale green, becoming soft-beige, and finally turning a deep, rich brown. It is certainly a wonderful plant as the flowers attract masses of bees and butterflies. The spines amongst the foliage provide a great protection for small birds though they pose a definite risk for small children and gardeners!

Sweet Bursaria
Sweet Bursaria

Sea Box Alyxia buxifolia, with white flowers, is a dense, spreading shrub which may be seen beside the cliff-top tracks, mainly in Aireys Inlet. The oval leaves are dark-green and leathery. The small, scented, white flowers are very distinctive as the five petals are twisted sideways into flat propeller-like spirals, reminding me of children’s pinwheels. The berries ripen to a striking, bright orange-red.

Sea Box
Sea Box

On the January nature ramble, we were pleased to see a couple of prostrate marsh plants in flower on the exposed mudflats in the Painkalac Creek estuary. Creeping Monkey-flower Thyridia repens (formerly Mimulus repens) has delicate butterfly-like mauve flowers among small, crowded, stalkless leaves.

Monkey-flower
Monkey-flower 

Creeping Brookweed Samolus repens var. repens, has small leaves, and erect, five-petalled flowers that are usually white, but sometimes a luscious soft pink.

 Creeping Brookweed
Creeping Brookweed

Finally, in these dry times, it is heartening to see the lovely pink-mauve nodding flowers of Paper Flower Thomasia petalocalyx across the heathlands. This low-growing, hardy bush has a soft hairy appearance due to a covering of stellate, or star-shaped, hairs.

 Paper Flower
Paper Flower

Remember to take your Flowers of Anglesea and Aireys Inlet on your walks.

Ellinor Campbell

Events Calendar

Nov
25

Sat 9:00am - 3:00pm

Nov
26

Sun 9:30am - 11:00am

Nov
27

Mon 9:30am - 11:00am

Nov
27

Mon 11:00am - 1:00pm

Weed of the month

Freesia

Freesia

Freesia refracta and Freesia alba X F. leichtlinii are declared weeds in the Surf Coast Shire because they spread easily and threaten to invade bushland. Freesias are perennial herbs that die back in summer and produce new foliage in winter. The highly fragrant trumpet-shaped flowers appearing in spring are white to cream and pink with yellow markings, shaded purple on outer surface. Each plant has at least two corms, one below the other, thus requiring deep digging to remove them.

More details about how to control this weed can be found in the archive of Weeds of the Month.

Sign up for membership

ANGAIR membership gives you access to a range of great activities and benefits. Learn more about all these benefits as well as how to sign up and renew.

Sign Up

Get to know your local Friends groups

There are a number of wonderful local Friends Groups that provide ANGAIR members and the community with opportunities for involvement.

Find a local group

Go to top