It was an inauspicious start to our walk as the morning was wet and rainy and we had to navigate a route to Triplet Falls around road closures for long-distance bike races in the very area we were heading. Perhaps deterred by the weather and the difficulties getting there, only 8 members met at the Aireys Inlet Hall to go on the walk.

After a long drive we had a well-earned morning tea at Gellibrand in drier conditions.

Morning tea at Gellibrand
Morning tea at Gellibrand 

Once arriving at the car park for the Falls we chose to walk the circuit in a clockwise direction and so visited Little Aire Falls first.

Group at start of walk
Group at start of walk

Maybe because of the earlier rain, the fungi appeared thick and numerous, and also brought out some unique Otway Black Snails.

Fungi

Fungi

Fungi
Fungi

Otway Snail
Otway Snail

We were awed by the number of large, old Myrtle Beeches as well as some remnant Mountain Ash along the trail.

Trees on track
Trees on track

Buttress of Mountain Ash
Buttress of Mountain Ash

Little Aire Falls were very picturesque and a great viewing while we had lunch.

Little Aire Falls
Little Aire Falls

After lunch we continued back up the many steps and made our way to Triplet Falls.

Plenty of steps along the way
Plenty of steps along the way

Triplet Falls are a picturesque and extensive set of cascades on Youngs Creek that richly deserve their name.

Triplet Falls with group
Triplet Falls with group

It was a bit of an anticlimax as we headed back to the car park to return to civilisation, but with the bonus that road closures were no longer in effect and we could take a more direct route home.

Report by Patrick Flanagan.
Photographs by Margaret MacDonald

 

Events Calendar

Nov
23

Thu 9:00am - 12:00pm

Nov
25

Sat 9:00am - 3:00pm

Nov
26

Sun 9:30am - 11:00am

Nov
27

Mon 9:30am - 11:00am

Weed of the month

Freesia

Freesia

Freesia refracta and Freesia alba X F. leichtlinii are declared weeds in the Surf Coast Shire because they spread easily and threaten to invade bushland. Freesias are perennial herbs that die back in summer and produce new foliage in winter. The highly fragrant trumpet-shaped flowers appearing in spring are white to cream and pink with yellow markings, shaded purple on outer surface. Each plant has at least two corms, one below the other, thus requiring deep digging to remove them.

More details about how to control this weed can be found in the archive of Weeds of the Month.

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