Our visit to Werribee Zoo was on Saturday 19 August. Fourteen people met at the entrance to the Zoo and were joined there by Sarah, our Guide for the day.

Group at gate
Group at gate

Sarah
Sarah

We were shown the nocturnal exhibits where the Eastern Barred Bandicoots are kept. Their numbers in the wild were so critically low, that in Victoria they now only survive in fenced areas and zoos.

Our second stop was at the Orange-bellied Parrot (OBP) enclosure. There are three male OBPs living in the aviary. We were very pleased to have the opportunity to view these extremely rare parrots.

OBP
Male Orange-bellied Parrot (Photo by Graham Smith)

We were then guided through various enclosures. African Lions, African Wild Dogs, Silver-backed Gorillas and Cheetahs. Sarah was happy to answer questions and talk at length about the measures taken to ensure that all the animals in the care of the Zoo are kept healthy, both psychologically and physically, and also stimulated so as not to become bored or depressed.

There were plenty of opportunities for photos:

Photographers at work
Photographers at work

Three sleepy hippos
Three sleepy hippos

At lunchtime, the sun came out and we enjoyed a picnic lunch before boarding the Safari bus about 2.00 pm.

Safari Bus
Safari Bus

The safari tour lasted for about 45 minutes. We were driven through savannah habitats containing groups of large herbivores such as Rhinos, giraffes, zebras, Mongolian Wild Horses, Addaxes, Elands, Indian Antelopes and many others.

Addax
Addax

Indian Antelopes
Indian Antelopes

Giraffes
Giraffes

Rhinos
Rhinos

At the end of the tour, we enjoyed an afternoon tea break at the Bistro where we were entertained by Meerkat activity just outside the restaurant windows.

Meerkats
Meerkats

Report and photographs by Margaret MacDonald

Events Calendar

Nov
25

Sat 9:00am - 3:00pm

Nov
26

Sun 9:30am - 11:00am

Nov
27

Mon 9:30am - 11:00am

Nov
27

Mon 11:00am - 1:00pm

Weed of the month

Freesia

Freesia

Freesia refracta and Freesia alba X F. leichtlinii are declared weeds in the Surf Coast Shire because they spread easily and threaten to invade bushland. Freesias are perennial herbs that die back in summer and produce new foliage in winter. The highly fragrant trumpet-shaped flowers appearing in spring are white to cream and pink with yellow markings, shaded purple on outer surface. Each plant has at least two corms, one below the other, thus requiring deep digging to remove them.

More details about how to control this weed can be found in the archive of Weeds of the Month.

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