We tend not to think of the various categories of linear areas such as road, rail and waterway alignments as being reserves, because, naturally enough, their primary function is utilitarian.

Nevertheless, many also make valuable contributions to nature conservation, not least by providing a pathway for birds, animals, insects and even plants to migrate. When land in the Surf Coast was being selected, most stream sides were also reserved, sometimes as a a set distance each side of the stream or drawn on a map. If the stream changed its course, the reserve remained in its position, occasionally at some distance from the new stream alignment. Sometimes the latter system resulted in peculiar-shaped areas ’left over‘ after land selection. 

One of these is on Thompsons Creek at Willowite Road near Freshwater Creek. The map shows the road and several Crown Land allotments around the crossing point, along with the reserve that continues up and downstream.

map

Thompson Creek Water Frontage Reserve at Willowite Rd

DELWP is responsible for managing the area, but small sites like this (only 1.3 ha not counting the reserve extending along the creek) get little attention, which is a pity because of the importance for water quality of natural streamside vegetation, and in this case some tiny areas of remnant volcanic plains grassy woodland above the banks.

milkmaidsMilkmaids

About 180 species of all kinds have been reported, with about one third being introduced.

chocolatelilyChocolate Lily

There is a surprisingly large list of 63 birds, and researchers have recorded four native fish species and a freshwater shrimp. Rabbits prove their presence by some warrens and droppings, sheep by the wool left on briar rose thorns, a fox by the remains of its meal and a peacock by being the meal.

thompsoncreekcrossingThompson Creek crossing

ANGAIR’s Mary White produced a little publication called Small is beautiful. I think that applies here.

Neil Tucker

Events Calendar

Jun
8

Mon 9:00am - 11:00am

Jun
12

Fri 4:00pm - 5:30pm

Jun
13

Sat 8:30am - 11:30am

Jun
15

Mon 9:30am - 11:00am

Jun
22

Mon 9:30am - 11:00am

Weed of the month

Freesia

Freesia

Freesia refracta and Freesia alba X F. leichtlinii are declared weeds in the Surf Coast Shire because they spread easily and threaten to invade bushland. Freesias are perennial herbs that die back in summer and produce new foliage in winter. The highly fragrant trumpet-shaped flowers appearing in spring are white to cream and pink with yellow markings, shaded purple on outer surface. Each plant has at least two corms, one below the other, thus requiring deep digging to remove them.

More details about how to control this weed can be found in the archive of Weeds of the Month.

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