On my summer rambles I have been pleasantly surprised at the number of plants in flower or with interesting seeds.

 

 

A special treat for me has been Angled Lobelia, Lobelia anceps, spreading out in some damp locations. The small, uneven, five-petalled blue flowers, with three lower fan-like petals, appear to dance around on their long, thin stems.

Angled Lobelia

Angled Lobelia

Succulents, of course, are hot, dry weather specialists, and I noticed some Karkalla, Carpobrotus rossi, with shining white centred, pink or magenta flowers in amongst the thick fleshy leaves.

Karkalla
Karkalla

Along Ted’s Track I found many Woolly Rice-flowers, Pimelia octophylla, with demure, nodding, woolly cream flower-heads.

Woolly Rice-flower

Woolly Rice-flower

Paper Flower, Thomasia petalocalyx, is still flowering in exposed places on coastal heathlands, with numerous small, mauve, nodding, papery flowers, and pale-green, hairy leaves.

Paper Flower

Paper Flower

Silky Guinea-flower Hibbertia sericea, with clusters of bright yellow flowers and small green hairy leaves, is brightening up many areas.

Silky Guinea-flower

Silky Guinea-flower

Along the clifftops I spied the unusual shining white flowers on Sea-box, Alyxia buxifolia. The small, white, propeller-like flowers make me think of my childhood toy windmills, and running along holding them up as they spun in the wind. The lush red berries that follow the flowers should be appearing this month.

Sea-box

Sea-box

Coastal Beard-heath, Leucopogon parviflorus, a common coastal bush, of variable size, with lots of small white, sweet seeds has also appeared.

Prickly Currant-bush, Coprosma quadrifida, a shrub found in moist forest/woodland, had small, eye-catching red berries. The foliage of the Currant-bush is easily confused with Sweet Bursaria which has been flowering profusely as described in the December newsletter, so the existence of red berries or white flowers is a very useful means of identification.

Prickly Currant-bush

Prickly Currant-bush

In many places, including my driveway, I saw Blackwood, Acacia melanoxylon, bearing and dropping copious numbers of twisted, curling narrow, leathery seedpods which I find quite entrancing. They open out to display numerous black seeds, surrounded by a conspicuous fleshy salmon pink ‘aril’ which attaches the seed to the wall of the pod.

Blackwood

Blackwood

I have saved the best for last, as, Ixodia achillaeoides subsp. alata, looks set this year to put on a great display. This low-growing shrub often grows in quite exposed and inhospitable locations and has dense clusters of shining, white, papery, daisy-like flowers.The rich-green, narrow leaves tend to curl downwards. 

Ixodia
Ixodia 

With a careful search who knows what little gems you might see, so remember to take your Flowers of Anglesea and Aireys Inlet.

Ellinor Campbell

 

Events Calendar

Aug
21

Mon 11:00am - 1:00pm

Aug
22

Tue 9:00am - 11:00am

Aug
24

Thu 9:00am - 12:00pm

Weed of the month

Bushy Yate

Bushy Yate

Bushy Yate, Eucalyptus lehmannii, is an evergreen densely rounded tree to 8m with spread of 3m. It is endemic to the south coast of Western Australia but has naturalised into the Surf Coast cliffs, coastal areas and bushland where it seeds prolifically. The orange flower pods form clusters like fingers extending from a hand and the horned seed capsules are fused at the base in clusters of five to eight.

More details about how to control this weed can be found in the archive of Weeds of the Month.

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